Sunday, May 29, 2016

Final Chocolate Recalls of May 2016

We end May 2016 with one more chocolate related recall and yes it has to do with the entire Listeria recall craze going on right now. This is through a grocery store chain called Hy-Vee that has stores in 8 different midwestern states. If the name Hy-Vee represents a store you shop in, protect your family and check this out.

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Hy-Vee Voluntarily Recalls Six Trail Mix Products Due to Possible Health Risk

Hy-Vee, Inc., based in West Des Moines, Iowa, is voluntarily recalling six trail mix products across its eight-state region due to possible contamination with Listeria monocytogenes. The products include Hy-Vee Caramel Cashew Honey Crunch Trail Mix, Hy-Vee Dark Chocolate Cranberry Trail Mix, Hy-Vee Mountain Trail Mix, Hy-Vee Mountain Trail Mix To Go, Hy-Vee Berry Trail Mix and Hy-Vee Santa Fe Trail Mix. Listeria monocytogenes is an organism, which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria monocytogenes infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

To date, no illnesses have been reported in connection with these products.

Out of an abundance of caution, Hy-Vee is recalling the following products from all of its stores:

Hy-Vee Caramel Cashew Honey Crunch Trail Mix — sold in 24 oz. bags with the UPC number 75450040586 and with a “best by” date of April 5, 2017

Hy-Vee Dark Chocolate Cranberry Trail Mix — sold in 24 oz. bags with the UPC number 75450041354 and with a “best by” date of April 14, 2017


Hy-Vee Mountain Trail Mix — sold in 26 oz. bags with the UPC number 75450016796 and with a “best by” date of April 5, 2017, and April 15, 2017


Hy-Vee Mountain Trail Mix To Go — sold in 1.75 oz. bags with the UPC number 75450040739 and with a “best by” date of March 23, 2017

Hy-Vee Berry Trail Mix — sold in 7 oz. bags with the UPC number 75450040593 and with a “best by” date of March 19, 2017

Hy-Vee Santa Fe Trail Mix — sold in 6.5 oz. bags with the UPC number 75450041101 and with a “best by” date of March 31, 2017

The potential for contamination was discovered after Hy-Vee’s supplier, SunOpta, announced they were recalling specific lots of sunflower kernels due to the potential for Listeria monocytogenes. The initial recall was limited to sunflower kernel products produced at SunOpta’s Crookston, Minnesota, facility; however, the recall was recently expanded to all products produced at the facility between Feb. 20 and April 20.

Customers who purchased this product should discard it or return it to their local Hy-Vee store for a full refund.

Consumers with questions may contact Hy-Vee Customer Care representatives 24 hours a day, seven days a week at 1-800-772-4098.

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Top 10 Cookbook Fails

As I'm working my way through another cookbook to review for you all, I am accosted by problems that I see constantly in cookbooks. To vent, I've made a list. Check it out then leave a comment about the problems you've found in physical cookbooks not online or ebook ones. While I could show you covers of cookbooks with all of these problems, I don't want to single any one book out; you can find my criticisms in the reviews I do!

#10 Unrealistic Photos!

This is the least important problem because you the buyer should know that the cookbook author or publisher wants to put their best results forward. They may make dozens of cookies then take the best six to show in the photo. Plus a professionally published cookbook will have professional photography so the lighting, the backgrounds, everything will be of the highest quality. So how is this a problem? It is only a problem when people trying the recipes think less of their abilities because "it doesn't look like the picture" a very common complaint I hear and read.

#9 Too Few Photos!

While it can be a challenge to not judge your results but a photo, not having a photo at all can lead to more insecurity. Many times I simply won't try a recipe unless it has a photo because I want some model to compare to what I'm doing. Plus a good photo can help with some of the more serious problems of cookbooks.

#8 Too Many Photos!

I know you're thinking -- make up your mind about photo, Chocolate Priestess! With print books, photos add costs; this is the main reason what #9 likely happens. We are becoming accustomed to tons of photos from finding recipes online or in ebooks but adding photos to these formats does little to increase cost. Some cookbooks want to really attend to the needs of the novice cook so they they use a lot of photos to show the steps. Instead they could have a how-to section which shows the steps commonly used once.

#7 Poor Editing!

As with any book, the author will be judged by the contents even if the publisher should have spent the time proofing before the final print. Poor editing of cookbooks tends to result in misnumbered pages, mislabeled chapters, missing pages, and mislabeled ingredients. You don't want to see a "T" next to salt if it really should be "tsp" -- YUCK! Sadly the author will be the one targeted, not the publisher, because most readers do not understand who is in charge of what what it comes to putting out cookbooks (or any books). By the way, target the author if they self-published because then it does all fall back on them.

#6 Unnecessary Sections!

As with photos, the number of pages adds to the cost of a cookbook. Some cookbooks are part biography or therapy and then include pitchy comments or tiny tales to try and engage the reader. There is nothing wrong with that if the buyer knows what is included in the book. However, seeing a small 1-2 paragraph narrative taking up an entire page over and over in a book starts to feel like these personalizations were added merely to pad out the cookbook. The best cookbooks attached these tiny tidbits to the recipe pages themselves so you can read if you want but not feel like they are just adding pages.

#5 Traditional Bindings!

I realize that spiral bindings may look "poor" but in terms of cookbooks I love them. Why? Because no matter the size of my space, I can lay that book down flat and not have to have a bookstand or heavy objects to hold it open. There are few things more frustrating that trying out a new recipe and then having the pages move or the book close while your hands are covered in whatever ingredient you last used! Breaking the spines of books to force them to lay flat only lower the lifespan of that book, making it likely that pages will fall out.

#4 Gourmet Kitchen Expectation!

I applaud the cookbooks that tell you upfront what equipment and ingredients you'll need in a starting chapter; I wish they did this in the book descriptions before I buy or agree to review a cookbook. My kitchen has limited space and therefore I have limited gadgets, pans, and ingredients that I can store. Toss into that the fact that not everyone has a lot of money to spend on ingredients or even access to some ingredients. What you the author might think of as "common" may be exotic to another person. The best cookbooks offer substitutes for ingredients and processing. The newbie trying out your recipe may not realize that things can be done a different way and they will simply return or toss out a cookbook whose recipes are beyond their kitchens.

#3 Mixing Up Measurements!

While this can be an issue of poor editing is this not missing or mislabeling but using multiple measurement systems. I've seend Imperial and US Customary Units used alongside Metric Units within the same recipe! If you aren't familiar with one, this will only add to your confusion. Likewise, you can measure by weight or by volume but they are not the same. A cup of cocoa may not be the same amount as 10 ounces of cocoa and that difference definitely changes your recipe.

#2 Missing Steps!

For the experienced cook or baker, a missing step in the directions might not be obvious -- of course, I need to stir occasionally or preheat the oven, we might realize. However cookbooks need to be written for folks with little or no experience, too. Plus not all dishes need a preheated oven and some need to be stirred all the time or not at all. A missing step can lead to a ruined dish.

#1 Missing Ingredients!

I've discovered recipes for baked goods that didn't list all of the ingredients I know that they need. I'm not talking about an optional spice but something like eggs, or a flour, or any type of moisture. Unless the recipe is labeled as "X-free" there are just certain things baked goods need. But if you are not experience you may not realize that and then you end up wasting time, money, and food.

Do you agree? Did I miss some cookbook problems? Leave a comment and let me know what you think!

Sunday, May 22, 2016

3 Recalls for May 22, 2016

Sadly I have move chocolate related recalls, and yes, some of these are still related to the Listeria problems.  Check the links for further and protect yourself.

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The Quaker Oats Company Issues Voluntary Recall of Quaker Quinoa Granola Bars Due to Possible Health Risk

The Quaker Oats Company, a subsidiary of PepsiCo, Inc., today announced a voluntary recall of a small quantity of Quaker Quinoa Granola Bars after an ingredient supplier was found to have distributed sunflower kernels that may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes (L.mono). There have been no reported illnesses to date. However, Quaker is initiating the voluntary recall in an abundance of caution to protect public health.

Listeria monocytogenes (L.mono) is an organism, which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

While the vast majority of potentially affected Quaker products were withheld from ever reaching retail shelves, the products being recalled were distributed nationwide and are as follows:

6.1 ounce boxes of Quaker Quinoa Granola Bars Chocolate Nut Medley with UPC code 30000 32241 and Best Before Dates of: 10/16/2016, 10/17/2016


6.1 ounce boxes of Quaker Quinoa Granola Bars Yogurt, Fruit & Nut with UPC 30000 32243 and Best Before Dates of: 10/10/2016, 10/11/2016

At this time there are no other Quaker products involved in this situation. The company is working closely with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to further investigate this issue, but in the meantime is taking these actions out of commitment to and concern for consumers.

Consumers who have purchased either of the above products are urged to dispose of or return them to the place of purchase for a full refund. They can also direct any questions to 800-856-5781, Monday – Friday, 8:30 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. (EST), or find more information at www.quakeroats.com.
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The Caramel Factory, LLC Issues An Allergy Alert
 (This isn't a particularly well written notice, is it? The photos aren't of the products, either, so I've tried to find a few better ones but the brand's website was not helpful)

The Caramel Factory, LLC of Batesville, MS, is recalling the following products for undeclared allergens:

Chocolate covered candies with undeclared milk and soy:

white and dark chocolate cashew turtles and tortoises
white and dark chocolate pecan turtles and tortoises
white and dark chocolate pecan krispie clusters
white and dark chocolate peanut clusters
white and dark chocolate cashew clusters
MS molded chocolate
sugar free milk chocolate peanut cluster
sugar free milk chocolate cashew cluster

Candies with undeclared milk and/or soy:
fudge
pecan fudge
peanut butter fudge
sea salt caramel fudge
salt water taffy
Rice Krispcicles

Candies with undeclared tree nuts, soy, and/or milk:
pralines

Baked Goods with undeclared tree nuts, soy, milk, and wheat:
cocoons

Candy with undeclared eggs and milk:
sugar free salt water taffy

Chocolate coated baked Goods with undeclared eggs, soy, wheat and/or milk:
White Trash
Oreos
Rice Krispcicles
chocolate covered Twinkies
chocolate covered pretzels
Baked goods with undeclared eggs, soy, wheat and/or milk
caramel sugar cookies
caramel cakes

Baked goods with undeclared eggs, tree nuts, soy, wheat and/or milk:
turtle brownies
praline cookies

People who have allergies to peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, soy, and/or wheat run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products.

These retail products were distributed from our retail store in Batesville, MS prior to May 11, 2016.

The products are packaged, clear plastic packages with the name of each product.

No illnesses have been reported to date in connection with this problem.

The recall was initiated after it was discovered that these products were distributed in packaging that did not declare these allergens

Consumers who have purchased any of these products are urged to return any unused product to us for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company at 1-662-563-9900, Monday through Friday, 9:30 AM to 4:30 PM.
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TreeHouse Foods Expands Voluntary Product Recall Due to Possible Health Risk
 
(This recall is so long in terms of the products that I must insist that you check out the linked title above.)

(Images of the recalled products here.)

Saturday, May 21, 2016

Celebrate the May Full Moon with Chocolate

Today will be a full moon according to NASA calculation and so in honor of the moon today we are going to look at Moonstruck's Dark Chocolate Sea Salt Almond bar. I've heard of Moonstruck before but have not the opportunity to test them and write about them all best this bar was a weekly freebie using my Kroger loyalty card. Sometimes when there serious chocolate as a freebie, I'll do a Sacrament for you all but I'm also planning a separate post late in 2016 to simply showcase the various chocolatey goodies you might be able to get using grocery or shop loyalty cards. No company or individual paid me in anyway for this review today but since it was totally free, and you might be able to find it in your grocery or mass merchandise stores, I wanted to cover it for you all.

The wrapper is blue and white and has an image of the St. Johns Bridge in Oregon under the Moonstruck logo of a man dancing and playing the pipes. The bar inside is very dark so I am not sure if you can see it well in my photo but it has the same image on it as on the wrapper. If you click on the photo you should be able to see the image more clearly. The ingredient list is short -- dark chocolate, soy lecithin, vanilla, almonds, and sea salt. There is a salty scent when I opened the silver foil around the bar as well as a good cocoa scent; if you break it into pieces you can release more of the chocolate fragrance. The bar is labeled 68% cacao so let's see how dark it tastes. The bar is not scored but you can break it relatively easily and it makes a snap sound to it. The bar is 3 oz and measures a touch over 6.5 inches long, 2.75 inches wide, and 0.25 inches thick.

You can see the dry roasted almond pieces from the bar of the bar and inside when I break it up. The bar makes a soft sound when I take a bite, the almond pieces are small and make only a slight crunch with each chew but their flavor and texture is widespread. The flavor is a smooth dark chocolate, not particularly bitter, there is an undercurrent of sweetness that builds up with each bite, a slight almond flavor, and happily a light salty taste. Over salty chocolate is sadly common so I really appreciate the focus on the chocolate itself in this bar versus the added ingredients of almond and salt.




The bar definitely earned Sacrament status for flavor and company ethics. This status is not something I given very often so far in 2016, Sisters and Brothers. Look around your local grocery stores and see if you can find it. It is worth the average $4 I've seen for it. Of course, if you can find it for less, on sale, or with a coupon, you must give it a try! Please leave a comment and let us know what you think.

Sunday, May 15, 2016

Listeria Affects Chocolate Products, Too!

Amid a massive frozen food recalls about Listeria (you need to check into that, Sisters and Brothers) there are some chocolate related recalls, too. Read closely to protect yourself and your love ones.

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Schulze and Burch Biscuit Co. Recalls Various Millville Protein Chewy Bars Products Because of Possible Health Risk

Schulze and Burch Biscuit Co., of Chicago, ILL  is voluntarily recalling a variety of Millville Protein Chewy Bars products because they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea. Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The Millville Protein Chewy Bars products were nationally distributed through Aldi stores and the company is recalling the following products. Consumers can find UPC codes and Best By/Date Codes on each package.

UPC Product Description Best By / Code Date

041498195601 Millville Protein Chewy Bars (Peanut, Dark Chocolate & Almond) DEC 04 16 1T1

041498195601 Millville Protein Chewy Bars (Peanut, Dark Chocolate & Almond) DEC 04 16 2T1

041498195601 Millville Protein Chewy Bars (Peanut, Dark Chocolate & Almond) DEC 18 16 1T1

041498195601 Millville Protein Chewy Bars (Peanut, Dark Chocolate & Almond) DEC 18 16 2T1

041498195601 Millville Protein Chewy Bars (Peanut, Dark Chocolate & Almond) DEC 31 16 2T1

041498195601 Millville Protein Chewy Bars (Peanut, Dark Chocolate & Almond) JAN 01 17 1T1

041498195601 Millville Protein Chewy Bars (Peanut, Dark Chocolate & Almond) JAN 01 17 2T1

041498195601 Millville Protein Chewy Bars (Peanut, Dark Chocolate & Almond) JAN 14 17 1T1

041498195601 Millville Protein Chewy Bars (Peanut, Dark Chocolate & Almond) JAN 14 17 2T1

041498195601 Millville Protein Chewy Bars (Peanut, Dark Chocolate & Almond) JAN 15 17 1T1

041498195601 Millville Protein Chewy Bars (Peanut, Dark Chocolate & Almond) JAN 20 17 2T1

041498195601 Millville Protein Chewy Bars (Peanut, Dark Chocolate & Almond) JAN 21 17 1T1

041498195151 Millville Protein Chewy Bars (Peanut Butter, Dark Chocolate) JAN 01 17 2T1

041498195151 Millville Protein Chewy Bars (Peanut Butter, Dark Chocolate) JAN 02 17 1T1

041498195151 Millville Protein Chewy Bars (Peanut Butter, Dark Chocolate) JAN 15 17 1T1

041498195151 Millville Protein Chewy Bars (Peanut Butter, Dark Chocolate) JAN 15 17 2T1

Schulze and Burch Biscuit Co. became aware of the potential contamination when informed by our supplier that the sunflower seeds may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes . We are working closely with FDA to continue to investigate the problem further.

Consumers who have purchased any of the above products are urged to dispose of or return the product to the place of purchase for a full refund.

Consumers with any questions may call the Consumer Contact: (888) 886-3879.

Consumer Care Team is available Monday – Friday, 8 a.m.– 4:30p.m. (PST).

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Two Food Recalls of Sweet & Salty Trail Mix - Because of Possible Health Risk, Due to Potential Presence of Listeria Monocytogenes

This is a combination of two recalls you can find here and here

#1: Rucker’s Wholesale and Service Co. of Bridgeport, IL is voluntarily recalling the specific code dates listed below of Uncle Bucks Sweet & Salty Trail Mix peg bag, due to the potential presence of Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems.  Although, healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms, such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The affected product is packaged in a 3.oz, clear bag with Uncle Buck paper header card, UPC 752545073390. This only affects packages with best by codes 031417 & 041817. The recall of Uncle Bucks Sweet & Salty Trail Mix is distributed nationwide in Bass Pro Shops stores.

Please note, no illnesses reported to date.

#2: Rucker’s Makin’ Batch Candies, Inc. of Bridgeport, IL is voluntarily recalling the specific code dates listed below of Dollywood Sweet & Salty Trail Mix cello bag, due to the potential presence of Listeria Monocytogenes. Listeria monocytogenes is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although, healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms, such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea. Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The affected product is packaged in an 11 oz. clear bag with Dollywood Theme Park label, UPC 490000503272. This only affects packages with best by codes 11-22-16 and 1-6-17. The product is distributed at Dollywood Theme Park in Pigeon Forge, TN.

Please note, no illnesses have been reported to date.

Rucker’s learned about the problem after being notified by our supplier that sunflower kernels used in the Sweet & Salty Trail Mix were recalled for potential presence of Listeria monocytogenes.

DO NOT CONSUME this product, consumers whom wish to receive a refund for unused portions or have questions, may contact Rucker’s at 618-945-2411, or 800-663-1857 Mon - Fri 7:30AM - 4:30PM CST, or email - customerservice@ruckerscandy.com


Saturday, May 14, 2016

Celebrate Endangered Species Day with Chocolate

Friday, May 20th, is Endangered Species Day which was created to raise consciousness about the number of animals on our planet that are in jeopardy of extinction. There is a chocolate company that also is focused on this issue: Endangered Species Chocolate Not only do they give back money to help protect endangered animals but this company isn't far from where I live. Endangered Species Chocolate is headquartered in Indianapolis about an hour or so north of me. I should ask them if I could get a tour of their headquarters at some point and write it all up for you all to read about. What do you think, Sisters and Brothers? This company sent us four bars of their new Natural Dark Chocolate with Caramel and Sea Salt in exchange for testing it and writing a honest review about the product; no other form of compensation was received.

The first thing you'll notice on any Endangered Species bar is the animal on the cover but inside the first wrapper you'll also find more information about that animal. Sometimes people who enjoy the bars from Endangered Species Chocolate will simply refer to the flavors by the animal so this would be The Bald Eagle Bar. The information in the first wrapper tells you about the animal. You'll learn about the cover animal's habitat, some interests facts about her life, but also about threats to the population, most of which are a result of human actions. You'll also learn about where Endangered Species donates money and where you can donate money if you are concerned about the particular animal.

This is a 60% cacao bar which isn't too dark, a little light for my prefered tastes but should be good for most of you if you love caramel and a bit of salt with your chocolate, too. But let's actually break some open and really check these bars out. When I opened the wrapper the first scent was salt with a hint of chocolate; when I broke open a square of it (I didn't do the greatest, job, I know) there was a light sweetness that reached my nose. The chocolate should break fairly easily (unless you were me the day I tested this) into 8 squares but it does make a sharp snapping sound. Biting into also makes a sharp snap and the first couple of bites are noisy as well. The initial flavor was the salt, a hint of chocolate, then a burst of buttery sweet when I bit into the pillow of caramel. The fades faded back into a salty caramel before settling into a nicely sweet, semi-dark chocolate. The caramel is not stick though as you can see in the photo it is fairly thick. I really liked this bar a lot as did the folks who helped me test it out.

There we have it, the newest bar in the large line up of bars from Endangered Species Chocolate. If the Natural Dark Chocolate with Caramel and Sea Salt bar sounds good to you, please look at your local grocery and mass merchandise shops to see if you can find them. Where I live, I can walk and within 5-10 minutes I could buy these buys at a half dozen different stores. They are Sacrament Worthy so what is keeping you from going out and finding one today? Remember you can break it into eight squares to share, four squares to consume one full serving, or just go crazy and eat the entire thing. Whichever you choose, you can feel good on multiple levels when you buy and eat this chocolate bar.

Sunday, May 8, 2016

Multiple Allergens Recalled for Cookies, Cakes, and Ice Cream

Several recalls today. Check them carefully and follow the FDA links for the fullest information.

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Blue Bell Ice Cream Recalls Mispackaged Rocky Road Pints That Contain Cookies 'N Cream Ice Cream; Potential Allergy Concerns For Those With Wheat and Soy Allergies (Blue Bell again? At least this is a labeling issue, huh?)

Blue Bell Ice Cream is voluntarily recalling select lots of Rocky Road pints produced in its Brenham, Texas, plant because they may be mispackaged and actually contain Cookies 'n Cream Ice Cream. That ice cream contains the undeclared allergens soy and wheat, which may present a serious or life-threatening allergic reaction risk to people who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to soy or wheat.
No illnesses have been reported to date, and there are no other health or safety concerns except for those posed to people that have soy or wheat allergies. A Blue Bell employee discovered the incorrect packaging while restocking a retailer.

The pints can be identified as a Rocky Road pint with a Cookies 'n Cream lid, and contain Cookies 'n Cream Ice Cream. They can also be identified by the following code located on the bottom of the pint: 022918576. A picture of the affected product is included below.

The ice cream pints were distributed in Texas and Louisiana through retail outlets, including food service accounts, convenience stores and supermarkets.

PRODUCT: Rocky Road Ice Cream pints with Cookies 'n Cream lid and Cookies 'n Cream product.

CODE DATE: 022918576

Consumers who have purchased these items can return them to the place of purchase for a full refund. For more information, consumers with questions may call 979-836-7977, Monday – Friday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. CST.
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Large Cookie Tray seems to be the one with cocoa and chocolate, Sisters and Brothers

PITTSBURGH – All lots of Giant Eagle brand Walnut Delight and Pecan Tassie cookies prepared and sold from the Bakery department inside Giant Eagle and Market District supermarkets with sell by dates through May 3, 2016 have been voluntarily recalled by Giant Eagle due to an undeclared milk allergen. People who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to milk run the risk of a serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products. The product is safe for consumption by those who do not have milk allergies.

Approximately 44,000 purchases containing the potentially affected Pecan Tassies and 290 purchases containing the potentially affected Walnut Delights were made in Giant Eagle and Market District supermarkets in Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Maryland and Indiana. There are no reported illnesses to date associated with this recall.

The Walnut Delights were sold in packages of six in plastic clam shells with a PLU of 69690. The Pecan Tassies were also sold in packages of six in plastic clam shells with a PLU of 77997, but were also included in small, medium and large cookie trays with PLUs of 9793, 9794 and 9795 respectively. All affected items were sold in the Bakery department.

Giant Eagle became aware of the issue for both items after a quality assurance review of the ingredient declaration. The product label for the bakery items, which contain milk, omitted milk as an allergen.

Customers with a milk allergy who have purchased the affected product should dispose of it or return it to their local Giant Eagle or Market District store for a refund. Customers with questions may call Giant Eagle Customer Care at 1-800-553-2324 Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. EST.

In addition to this public communication regarding this recall, Giant Eagle initiated its consumer recall telephone notification process. The consumer recall process uses purchase data and consumer telephone numbers housed in the Giant Eagle Advantage Card® database to alert those households that purchased the affected product and have updated telephone contact information in the database.
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So you shop at a Safeway? Check this out! No photos provided for this recall.

CSM Bakery Solutions (Atlanta, GA) is voluntarily recalling the following products:
Safeway 8" Single Layer Red Velvet Cake

ACME 12” Decorated Chocolate Chip Cookie

Jewel 12” Decorated Chocolate Chip Cookie

People who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to peanut run the risk of a serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products.

The 8” Single Layer Red Velvet Cake was sold in Safeway stores in Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico (Farmington and Aztec), South Dakota, and Nebraska. 

The 12” Decorated Chocolate Chip Cookie was sold in Acme stores in Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, New York and Jewel stores in Iowa, Illinois, and Indiana.

Products listed may contain undeclared peanuts.

Both products are merchandised in the bakery department and can be identified as follows:

Product Name Description of Package (Size) UPC Code Lot Code

Cake Red Velvet 1 Layer 8" Net Wt. 1lb 3oz
Unit UPC: 0226945
Sell Thru:Apr 14  16   (April 14, 2016) through May 2 16 (May 2, 2016)

12” Decorated Chocolate Chip Cookie 24 oz.
Unit UPC: 4114405568
Unit UPC:4114457856
Unit UPC: 4114457855 Sell Thru: May 02, 16

*latest sell thru date code based upon shelf life.

Scale Label is applied

12” Decorated Chocolate Chip Cookie 24 oz.
Unit UPC: 4114405568 Sell Thru Apr 28,  16

*latest sell thru date code based upon shelf life.

Scale label is applied

No illnesses have been reported to date.

The recall was initiated after it was discovered by CSM during post-production testing that flour containing undeclared peanut as a result of incidental contact was provided by a supplier to CSM Bakery Solutions. The flour was used in products distributed by CSM in packaging that did not reveal the presence of peanut.

Consumers and wholesale customers who have purchased the product are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact CSM Bakery Solutions at 1-800-241-8526 extension 4, option 3. Calls can be made to this office during normal business hours (EST) during the week.  Email inquiries can be sent to CSMrecall@csmbakerysolutions.com.  Consumers can also contact ACME and Jewel at 1-877-723-3929 at any time.
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No photos provided for the recall.

7-Eleven, Inc. of Irving, TX is recalling fully baked chocolate chunk, sugar and oatmeal raisin cookies produced by CSM Bakery Solutions frozen cookie pucks because they may contain undeclared peanut. People who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to peanuts run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products.
Fully baked cookies prepared from frozen pucks were distributed and sold prior to Friday, April 22 at 45 7-Eleven stores in Missouri, South Carolina and Texas.

Chocolate chunk, sugar and oatmeal raisin cookies are sold fresh in a self-serve bakery case or within a countertop self-serve, acrylic case. There is no UPC code or label attached to these cookies.

No illnesses have been reported to date.

7-Eleven was notified that these products may contain undeclared peanut by its supplier and has pulled all fully baked and frozen cookie pucks provided by CSM Bakery Solutions from our stores until the issue with our supplier is resolved.

Consumers who have purchased the above are urged to discard. Consumers with questions may contact the company at 1-800-255-0711, Monday – Friday, 8 am – 5 pm EDT.
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Bakery Express of Central FL., Inc of Orlando, Florida is recalling select 7-ELEVEN FRESH TO GO cookies, because they may contain undeclared peanuts. People who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to peanuts run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products.

The select 7-ELEVEN FRESH TO GO Cookies were distributed to 7-Eleven convenience stores in the state of Florida.

The affected cookies are packed in a clear package film, 2 cookies per package, labeled “Fresh To Go” and have “best buy” date codes Friday, 04/22/16, Saturday, 04/23/16, Sunday, 04/24/16 on the front label.

7-Eleven Fresh To Go Sugar Cookie made with M&M chocolate candy, UPC: 052548558765

Product Description Lot Code Best By Dates
2 pack cookies 041916 4/24/16
  042016 4/24/16
  012116 4/24/16

7-Eleven Fresh To Go Peanut Butter Cookie, UPC: 052548585570
Product Description Lot Code Best By Dates
2 pack cookies 041916 4/24/16
  042016 4/24/16
  042116 4/24/16

No illnesses have been reported to date.

The recall was initiated after one of our suppliers, CSM Bakery Solutions, reported that three different pre-bagged dry cookie mix bases may contain undeclared peanuts. These potentially contaminated cookie bases were used in production and distributed in packaging that did not reveal the presence of peanuts. The company and the ingredient supplier continue their investigation to determine the cause of the problem.

Consumers who have purchased the above “best buy” date codes of the affected cookies are urged to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company at 1-800-255-0711 Monday – Friday, 8am – 5pm EDT

Saturday, May 7, 2016

Equal Exchange Gets Even Darker

If you've been reading The Chocolate Cult for years, you will know Equal Exchange. We are lucky that when they have a new product out, they entrust us to test it and reveal it to you all. Prior to 2016, the darkest 2.8oz bar you could get from Equal Exchange was 71% but now you can get their Extreme Dark which clocks in at 88%! I know, that's getting too dark for many of you but it is on the edge of what I love depending on the intensity of the sugar that is added to it. Before we get to that I want to state clearly that in the photos you will see a very broken up bar. This is neither the fault of the company nor myself. Someone in transit the cardboard cylinder you see in this photo came loose and when I started to open it, one end suddenly popped off and the bars fell out. Equal Exchange sent me these bars to test out and write an honest review about; no other form of compensation was received.

One of the really cool things about Equal Exchange is their wrappers. Not only are the varieties color coded to help you remember which ones you liked best, but inside there is more information about Equal Exchange and the co-ops that they work with. In this case there is a photo of Cruz Alvarado and information about the Fortaleza del Valle co-op in the Manabi Province of Ecuador. Ecuador is one of four countries that Equal Exchange gets their cacao beans from. I didn't want to take a closer photo of this information for this post because I didn't have specific permission to do so, but you can find a lot of this information on their website or better still, inside your own bar's wrapper! You might find Equal Exchange in food co-ops in your area or some natural food stores but it can be a challenge to find so I've linked to the specific product a few times in this post.

There is an internal white plastic wrapper underneath this paper wrapper. As soon as I open that a dark cocoa fragrance hit my nose. Just cocoa, not a hint of vanilla or sugar here. Remember this is 88%! It has a dark brown color and there are 24 sections etched into it that are fairly easy to break apart. 12 of these sections is one serving. Now, remember that chocolate is not low-calorie food but it can be healthy for you especially at these higher cacao percentage levels. There isn't much added sugar here; only 4g per serving. Each serving also has 5g dietary fiber and 13g saturated fat (not the same as you get from meat really; I wish they'd differ between plant and animal saturated fat but I digress). The flavor that immediately hits my tongue after I take a bite is intense chocolate that quickly turns to the more bitter side of things. The bite and the first couple of chews makes loud sounds but the chocolate quickly starts to melt in my mouth. I'm one of the lucky folks who can get what I call a cocoa rush -- my blood vessels expand, headaches and muscle tension lessens, and even my pupils dilate and let in more light. I get those reactions with the first section. The result is that I only want a half serving of this before I'm totally chocolate sated.

Extreme Dark is only for the dark chocolate lover who can handle the intense bitterness that is about as close to just eating cocoa bean as you can get unless you love to eat cocoa nibs (I do, by the way). Given Equal Exchange's ethics and the quality of this bar, this certainly earns Sacrament Status. Now I'm off this weekend to a convention where I'll be sharing the rest of these bars with a group of folks. I hope they agree with my assessment.

Wednesday, May 4, 2016

Empowering Farmers the Equal Exchange Way

I know, it is May 4th... and all of us geeks are going crazy. Yes, I am making semi-sweet Darth Vader heads for dinner but we also have a brand new brand from one of the coolest brands to share on Saturday so I wanted to tell you more about them. Sisters and Brothers in Chocolate, please help me welcome Dary Goodrich, the Chocolate Products Manager at Equal Exchange. He is going to tell us more about the company and about himself before our Saturday Sacrament featuring them this weekend. Mr. Goodrich, thank you for joining us for this interview.

Let's start with a really basic question, Dary. Do you like chocolate? If so, do you prefer white, milk, or darker chocolate?  

Yes, I definitely like chocolate…  I’d be in the wrong job if I didn’t!  Honestly, I typically like all type of chocolate but I usually eat dark chocolate. That said there are some great milk chocolates out there (I lean towards darker milk chocolate when eating for pleasure).  Right now I keep reaching for our Panama 80% dark chocolate.

You have held two managerial positions at Equal Exchange. Do you have a management degree or did you work your way up in business?  

I do not have a management degree. I studied Environmental Policy in college and I ended up getting a job at EE about a year after I graduated because its mission was a real fit for me. I have now been at EE for over 15 years. We are actually a worker-owned cooperative, meaning the company is owned and controlled by the employees, and something we do as an organization is support people moving throughout the organization.  This can take the form of access to different jobs within the company or access to leadership in our governance structure. I’ve had great opportunities allowing me to now manage our chocolate program and I’ve also been on our Board of Directors. 

Your previous position with Equal Exchange was with their Interfaith Programs. Would you please tell us what that is and how it works?

Around 1996, about 10 years after EE was founded, one of our colleagues at the time, Erbin Crowell, realized that outside of more traditional channels (markets, cafes, etc.) a lot of congregations were using Equal Exchange coffee to live out their social justice mission by using fair trade coffee during coffee hour to support small-scale farmers and communities in other parts of the world.  He worked with Lutheran World Relief to pilot the Lutheran Coffee Project that was a collaborative partnership to between the Lutherans and EE to promote fair trade in churches.  The model was that EE worked with Lutheran World Relief, the relief and development organization within the larger Lutheran denomination, to create co-branded materials promoting fair trade to people in the congregations.  Congregations bought coffee from Equal Exchange to serve at coffee hour or to sell for fundraisers or holiday bazaars, and through this action churches had a positive impact for farmers, they were able to educate their members about social justice issues and EE donated a certain amount of money per pound of product back to Lutheran World relief to help further their work.  The pilot was a huge success and we have since expanded to 13 different partnerships and have worked with over 10,000 congregations around the US.

To go from working with the Interfaith Programs to Chocolate Products Manager seems like it would require a lot of training in cocoa farming and the production of chocolate. Would you tell us what type of training this was and where you were trained? Was it within Equal Exchange itself?  

Equal Exchange partners with farmer cooperatives and we actually work with family owned companies to make our products, so luckily I didn’t have to be an expert in all of these things right off the bat!  We really rely a lot on our partners’ expertise to bring our customers the great products that we offer. That said, I had to learn a lot about managing and launching products and I was able to learn from my colleagues but without a doubt there was also a lot of trial and error. This is a job and industry where there is just so much to learn and what I know is really just the tip of the iceberg and things are constantly in motion.  It’s complex and every time I visit one of our partners I continue to learn a lot, and hopefully vice-versa. As an example of how we and our partners are constantly learning, we actually have been working with several of our farmer partners through a USAID grant that we have focused on supporting the farmer coops to increase their productivity and quality and to also implement member equity programs similar to our coop ownership model at EE. For all of us involved it has been a huge learning experience. 

Ledices Alberto Zamora of the association Fortaleza del Valle in Ecuador
As an industry, we still have so much to learn to really understand flavor development through the post-harvest process and there are many different tools to improve productivity.  How this is can be most effective at each coop, really depends on the context of the coop and country.  Even at a particular coop, the context is constantly changing.  A great example is that we worked with a partner coop of ours in Ecuador so they now have the resources to analyze their cocoa bean quality through making small batch chocolate liquor samples. With this tool, they worked on updating their post-harvest infrastructure and protocols to create more consistent and higher quality bean flavor profiles.  They made lots of changes and felt good about their quality but sometime after this, they realized when tasting liquor samples that something was making their beans much more astringent than usual. They did some investigation and learned that there had been microclimate changes at one of their central collection and processing centers and the beans were no longer getting to a high enough temperature during the fermentation process and they weren’t fully fermenting.  Based on this information they actually built an additional wall around their fermentation tanks, which did a better job of regulating the temperature and once again allowed the beans to fully ferment.  This is just one example the need for our industry to constantly be learning and adapting to provide chocolate lovers with a great quality product.

Equal Exchange is a Co-op not merely a company or brand. Tell us what the difference is between this business model and the ones that many if not most chocolate companies follow.

Being a worker cooperative means that we are a democratic workplace where employees both control the company and we have an ownership stake in the company.  What does this mean? In terms of ownership, employees who become members in the coop (typically staff become members after their first year) actually buy 1 share of stock in the company.  This ownership stake gives us control of the company because with this 1 membership share we each get 1 membership vote. Currently we have over 110 employees who are members of the cooperative. What can we vote on?  Pretty much anything we want to change at the governance level of our company, but that said, our main powers lie in voting in our Board of Directors (we are the ones who choose the Board) and we can change our bylaws.  Our Board typically consists of 6 of our employees and 3 external Board members meaning our employees are always a majority of the Board but we find real value in having external members to give us different perspectives and bring specific skill sets. On the day-to-day, EE has a more traditional management structure of how decisions get made so as worker owners we come together to make governance decisions as a body every couple of months.

This is of course very different from the traditional capitalist model that dominate the US, where most companies are owned and controlled by external shareholders (or a very small # of internal shareholders) and the sole purpose of a corporation is to return greater profits to the shareholders.  At EE, the employees provide capital to the company and therefore the employees are the beneficiaries of the success of the company and of course with our mission we also build in mechanisms to ensure that our company benefits other stakeholders like our farmer partners and our customers.  In a traditional company, the vast majority of the time, employees have zero influence on the company’s mission and vision or how it works in this world. For us, we are the ones that decide what we should be accomplishing as a company and what kind of impact we want to have.

There’s a lot more to it than that, but hopefully that gives you a little bit of an introduction to a worker cooperative.  I would also add that we strongly believe in the cooperative model beyond our own workplace and we only work with farmers that are democratically structured as farmer cooperatives or associations.  We believe this model empowers farmers to have more control over their business and better positions them to have direct market access to international markets and gain a voice in these markets.  When we first started we had a lot of support from food cooperatives in the US and we continue to have a strong connection with food coops around the US who sell our products.

How many countries does Equal Exchange work in? How often do you travel to each?

Equal Exchange as a company works in over 25 countries but for chocolate we focus mainly on the Dominican Republic, Panama, Ecuador, Peru and Paraguay. I try to travel to several countries per year and often have the chance to meet with various partner coops at trade events as well. Other colleagues on my team also travel to visit our partners we have a philosophy that every employee of EE will visit our farmer partners within the first 2 years at the company to really understand the work we do. (Photo: Ramon Antonio Mosquea, of the CONACADO Cooperative in the Dominican Republic, opening cocoa pod while Dary Goodrich watches)

Within each country you have cocoa or sugar co-ops that you work with. Did Equal Exchange help establish these co-ops or did they exist before you? Which one was the first one you made a business alliance with?  

We do not establish coops but rather work with coops that already exist.  Our first chocolate product was actually hot cocoa, which we launched in 2002.  When we started, we used cocoa beans from the CONACADO cooperative in the Dominican Republic, sugar from the Manduvira cooperative in Paraguay and we sourced our milk powder from Organic Valley, a dairy cooperative in the US. Today we still work with all 3 of these farmer cooperatives for our hot cocoa, as well as in many of our other products. 

I don't want to get you into trouble, Dary, by asking for a favorite co-op, but perhaps you could share an inspirational encounter that you've had at a co-op that helps you keep going when all the travel and business stresses start to press on you. 

Ha! It’s great to work with the diversity of coops that we work with from smaller coops with several hundred members to larger coops with over 8,000 members.  For me, I would highlight a particularly close connection I have with the CONACADO cooperative in the Dominican Republic based on our long history with them and their move up the value chain. As I said, we’ve been working with them since 2002 when we launched our chocolate program and we continue to work them today.  What’s been really exciting is to work with them as they’ve moved up the value chain.  In 2002, there was really no one processing organic cocoa beans in the US so CONACADO beans were shipped to Europe to be processed into cocoa powder and then the powder was shipped to the US for our product.  In 2008, CONACADO purchased a manufacturing plant in the Dominican Republic to process their beans into semi-finished products (chocolate liquor, cocoa powder and cocoa butter).  In 2010, we began buying cocoa powder directly from the plant in the DR and in 2015 we imported 80 Metric Tons of cocoa powder directly from CONACDAO for our cocoa products.  We’ve been working closely with CONACADO at the production plant to support the strengthening of their food safety and quality programs. I’m really proud of what we’ve accomplished together.

Equal Exchange does far more than chocolate but you began with coffee, is that correct? Now Equal Exchange partners with growers of all types of food. Some of these like sugar, coffee, and nuts you combine with the chocolate. Ideally, does Equal Exchange want to create a collective of growers and producers who trade only with each other?

Our mission is to build alternative supply chains for small-scale farmers and as you note this can span across many products. There are actually cooperative principles that any cooperative should follow and one of them is “cooperation among cooperatives.” This principle dovetails perfectly with our fair trade mission to change trade for small-scale farmers, which I think can often be most effective through the cooperative model. This of course has many challenges and is always a work in progress. We now work with over 40 farmer cooperatives around the world (not just for cocoa and sugar but coffee, bananas, avocadoes, vanilla, nuts and dried fruits) and have seen a lot of success and impact over our 30 year history. This network is not just an EE network but really a larger authentic fair trade network that has grown since the inception of fair trade coffee began in the 1980s.

Finally as the Chocolate Products Manager, is there anything you are working on right now that you could give our readers a hint about? Anything that is new and exciting?

Actually, at the moment we are stepping back after a couple of big projects to take a little breather. One of these was the launch of our new Extreme Dark 88% chocolate.  (Our Saturday Sacrament will be about this new product) We are really excited about this bar, which is our darkest bar yet.  Based on this we don’t have any other major things in the work at the moment, but we are always out there looking for inspiration for when we will begin a new round of product development.

Thank you so much for speaking with us, Dary. This was fascinating. Readers, if you have any other questions, please leave a comment to ask them or simply let us know what you thought about this interview.

Sunday, May 1, 2016

7-Eleven and Chick-Fil-A Cookie Recalls

Recalls over undeclared peanuts in some cookies you can buy at Chick-Fil-A and 7-Eleven shops. Remember we are only sharing chocolate related varieties. Check the FDA links for other product affected by the recalls.

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Recall 1: Glenn Wayne Wholesale Bakery of Bohemia, NY, is recalling select 7-ELEVEN FRESH TO GO brand cookies because they may contain undeclared peanuts. People who have an allergy to peanuts run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products.

The select 7-ELEVEN FRESH TO GO Cookies were sold at 7-ELEVEN stores located throughout New York State.

The affected cookies are packed in a clear, plastic film, two cookies per package, NET WT. 4 OZ., with Best By dates codes: Friday 0422, Saturday 0423, and Sunday 0424 on the front label.

7-ELEVEN FRESH TO GO CHOCOLATE CHUNK COOKIE, UPC 052548558741; Manhattan UPC: 052548570668;

7-ELEVEN FRESH TO GO OATMEAL RAISIN COOKIE, UPC 052548558758; Manhattan UPC: 052548570651;

7-ELEVEN FRESH TO GO SUGAR COOKIE WITH M&M CHOCOLATE CANDY, UPC 052548558765; Manhattan UPC: 052548570644

No illnesses have been reported to date.

The recall was initiated after one of our suppliers reported that three different cookie mixes may contain undeclared peanuts. These potentially contaminated cookie mixes were used in production and distributed in packaging that did not reveal the presence of peanuts. The company and the ingredient supplier continue their investigation to determine the cause of the problem.

Consumers who have purchased the above Best By Date codes of the affected cookies are urged to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company at 1-800-255-0711, Monday – Friday, 8am - 5pm, EDT.
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Recall 2: Atlanta, GA – CSM Bakery Solutions is voluntarily recalling Chick-fil-A Chocolate Chunk Cookies because they may contain low levels of undeclared peanut. People who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to peanut run the risk of a serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products.
The recalled products were distributed through Chick-fil-A Restaurants.


The recalled products can be identified as follows:

Material Name Lot Number Best by date Ship Date

COOKIE, TFF CFA CHOC CHNK OAT, NO THAW 1000146515 Sep/25/2016 4/2/16

COOKIE, TFF CFA CHOC CHNK OAT, NO THAW 1000146515 Sep/25/2016 4/13/16

COOKIE, TFF CFA CHOC CHNK OAT, NO THAW 1000146526 Oct/08/2016 4/15/16

COOKIE, TFF CFA CHOC CHNK OAT, NO THAW 1000146526 Oct/08/2016 4/15/16

COOKIE, TFF CFA CHOC CHNK OAT, NO THAW 1000148294 Sep/13/2016 3/25/16

COOKIE, TFF CFA CHOC CHNK OAT, NO THAW 1000148294 Sep/13/2016 3/25/16

COOKIE, TFF CFA CHOC CHNK OAT, NO THAW 1000153626 Sep/26/2016 4/5/16

COOKIE, TFF CFA CHOC CHNK OAT, NO THAW 1000153626 Sep/26/2016 4/4/16

COOKIE, TFF CFA CHOC CHNK OAT, NO THAW 1000153626 Sep/26/2016 4/5/16

COOKIE, TFF CFA CHOC CHNK OAT, NO THAW 1000155869 Sep/26/2016 4/6/16

COOKIE, TFF CFA CHOC CHNK OAT, NO THAW 1000155869 Sep/26/2016 4/7/16

COOKIE, TFF CFA CHOC CHNK OAT, NO THAW 1000155869 Sep/26/2016 4/6/16

COOKIE, TFF CFA CHOC CHNK OAT, NO THAW 1000155869 Sep/26/2016 4/6/16

COOKIE, TFF CFA CHOC CHNK OAT, NO THAW 1000155869 Sep/26/2016 4/13/16

COOKIE, TFF CFA CHOC CHNK OAT, NO THAW 1000157620 Oct/03/2016 4/13/16

No illnesses have been reported to date.

The recall was initiated after it was discovered by CSM during post-production testing that flour containing low-levels of undeclared peanut as a result of incidental contact was provided by a supplier to CSM Bakery Solutions. The flour was used in products distributed by CSM in packaging that did not reveal the presence of peanut.

Consumers and wholesale customers who have purchased the product are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact CSM Bakery Solutions at 1-800-241-8526 extension 4, option 3. Calls can be made to this office during normal business hours (EST) during the week. Email inquiries can be sent to CSMrecall@csmbakerysolutions.com.
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Recall 3: Bakery Express of Southern California of Fullerton, CA is recalling 7-ELEVEN FRESH TO GO brand cookies, because it may contain undeclared peanuts. People who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to peanuts run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products.
The 7-ELEVEN FRESH TO GO cookies were distributed and sold throughout Southern California State including Los Angeles, San Diego, and Bakersfield local 7-Eleven stores.

The affected cookies are packed in a clear, plastic film with two cookies per package. Net weight of the package is 4oz., and products are labeled with Best By dates found on the front of the package above the ingredient list. Affected UPC Codes and Best By dates listed below:

7-Eleven Fresh To Go Chocolate Chunk Cookie, UPC: 052548558741

Product Description Best By Dates

Choco chunk (1421) 0425
Choco chunk (1421) 0424
Choco chunk (1421) 0423
Choco chunk (1421) 0422
Choco chunk (1421) 0421
Choco chunk (1421) 0420
Choco chunk (1421) 0419
Choco chunk (1421) 0418
Choco chunk (1421) 0417
Choco chunk (1421) 0416
Choco chunk (1421) 0415
Choco chunk (1421) 0414

No illnesses have been reported to date.

The recall was initiated after one of our suppliers reported that three different frozen cookies dough pucks may have contained undeclared peanuts. These potentially contaminated cookie pucks were used in production and distributed in packaging that did not reveal the presence of peanuts. The company and the ingredient supplier continue their investigation to determine the cause of the problem.

Consumers who have purchased the above Best By date codes of the affected cookies are urged to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund.

Consumers with questions may contact the company at 1-714-446-9470 Monday-Friday, 8am-5pm, PST.